All of our garments are manufactured and cut in New York City with the exception of some collaborations in Peru and Mexico City. We verify that our workers are paid fairly and work in proper conditions. Additionally, making the garments locally allows us to reduce transportation costs and emissions.

Although we cut and manufacture all our clothes in NYC, we source fabric from elsewhere. Even so, we look carefully at our suppliers to make sure that our fabrics are coming from an ethical place. We have asked our suppliers a series of questions about their labor policies and conditions, the compensation of workers, and the transportation of materials from one place to the next.

 

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THE BROOKLYN FASHION DESIGNER ACCELERATOR(BF+DA)

 

"The BF+DA is a new initiative launched by Pratt Institute providing over 21,000 square feet of 21st century production and work space where NYC designers/makers (including STUDY-NY) grow their start-ups into viable businesses, integrating local manufacturing and an ethical supply chain into their bottom line.

The BF+DA is a hub for ethical fashion and design. The BF+DA provides its Venture Fellows and Members access to on-site business mentorship, small-run apparel production, no minimum knitting services, digital fabrication services, showroom space and retail sites. The BF+DA offers sustainable strategies consulting, materials sourcing and links to existing NYC manufacturers."

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CONVERSATIONS IN CRAFT

 

This sweater will be sent to three different countries, NYC, Peru, and Afghanistan for skilled workers to embroider.  Each of the three factories will be paid $24 total for the embroidery. The amount of embroidery per sweater is then dependent on the hourly wage of each factory whether the embroidered design is complete or not. This project, launched in 2014 but is continuing throughout next year, will explore the value we, as consumers place on artisan craftsmanship and skilled labour. 

This is the beginning of what I hope will be a long conversation about labour issues, artisan craft collaboration and the value of workmanship. Who wants to have this conversation with me?